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5 Ways to Brighten up Your Garden on a Budget

Gardening is extremely fashionable in the UK. It’s a hobby that provides an opportunity to be active, while it’s a superb way to be creative and fashion an area – whether it’s a large, landscaped garden or a smaller yard – where you can relax and spend time outside during the summer months.

In addition to the enjoyment, it’s perfectly possible to transform your garden into somewhere special on a tight budget. You can do that by growing bright flowers such as billowing hydrangeas, ensuring you get the most out of your soil by making your own compost, or by giving furniture a new lease of life.

Here are five ways you can be savvy and brighten up your garden without breaking the bank:

 

  • Take cuttings and grow from seeds

 

Taking cuttings from plants that are already flourishing is one of the easiest ways to be frugal while working on your garden. Ask friends or neighbours if they have any plant cuttings or seeds they don’t need, so you can take them home to plant and grow in your own garden.

You can get seeds on the high street as well, plus it’s much cheaper to grow plants from seed than to buy them fully grown. It’s possible to pick up a variety of seeds from supermarkets for as little as 50p a packet, or there’s always eBay where there are thousands of retailers where you can pick up any kind you want.

 

  • Make your own compost

 

In addition to taking cuttings, composting is also one of the first things you should start doing and will mean you won’t have to spend additional money on fertilisers.

Composting is a great way of transforming your garden and kitchen waste into food for your plants. All you need to do is start collecting decomposable items and start your own pile, but do this on bare earth so worms and other organisms are able to aerate it.

A compost heap won’t immediately add colour to your garden, but it will – in the long run – enable you to improve the amount of nutrients and the structure of your soil. You’ll also use less water due to the moisture retention capacity of fertile soil, and importantly, the compost will help protect your precious plants against diseases.

 

  • Take care of the plants you’ve already got

 

All the fancy mod-cons you can get your hands on won’t make any difference if you aren’t looking after the plants you’ve already got.

Pay them the attention they require before you do anything else. Make time to think about the plants that thrive in the shade and the ones that love sunlight, adapting your care accordingly.

By paying attention to what’s already in your garden you’ll ensure it is able to flourish and grow to its potential, saving you money on replacing plants that have suffered due to lack of attention.

 

  • Give existing furniture a new lease of life

 

A lick of paint and some fresh colour is a great way to bring a new lease of life to your garden, whether it’s the fences, decking or outdoor furniture you choose to make over.  

If that doesn’t do the trick, you can get second-hand furniture on the cheap from plenty of places. Try looking on websites like Gumtree or your local Freecycle group, or when you visit your local recycling centre, look out for unwanted items, perhaps some shears or a rake that will help you out.  

 

  • Plan ahead

 

Finally, planning is the real key to success in the garden. It means you can work out how much you will be spending and make sure your ambitions to make your garden looking beautiful are well worth it.

Turn your garden into your own project. Think about the plants and flowers you want for the next year during winter to allow you to source the seeds you need in good time.

Finally, if you’ve got an artistic streak you could envision your garden and sketch out what you want it to look like once all your hard work has been implemented.

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